Last time I wrote, I promised to post soon on the value of Interior Design. If you’re wondering what on earth I am on about, read on.

Here’s a stat that might surprise and shock you in equal measure. On average, we spend 90% of our time indoors (no, there is no typo there). In other words, we spend most of our lives interacting with some form of interior (yes, we even interact with some form of interior when we sleep). It follows that what we do with our interiors has a significant effect on us, certainly bigger than I had imagined.  

The state of our built environment and interiors affects our wellbeing, mood, health, productivity, interaction with one another, comfort, safety and more. Not many regard Interior Design as overarching as this, but as the inspirational Shashi Caan argues (a guru Interior Design thinker and practitioner), Interior Design is the design discipline that is “most profoundly connected to human concerns” (http://www.sccollective.com/profile/publications – this book is my bible!) 

I first came across the 90% statistic when researching the concept of Healthy Spaces (more on that soon, in a different blog post); and have never looked at the built environment quite the same way again. Let’s break down the argument and look at some examples. 

MOOD

Can you recall a time you entered a space and your face lit up? A swoonsome new restaurant, a cool and relaxed co-working space, or the most amazing hotel bedroom you have ever slept in in your life. By the same token, you probably remember some drab spaces that have made you feel down in the dumps, wanting to turn around and leave. A miserable old-fashioned office, a cluttered and dingy home, or perhaps a drab function hall with ridiculously high ceilings, freezing temperature and cold lighting. In these instances, you will note that the state of a given interior has had a direct influence on how you felt. Well, this happens all the time, with every single space that we enter. It happens so much that we don’t even think about it, but perhaps we should?

Perrachica Madrid

Uplifting restaurant interior (Perrachica Madrid) – how would you feel entering this space? Source: http://perrachica.com

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

As for health and wellbeing, don’t even get me started. I’m sorry to say, but I have recently found out that more often than not, interiors contribute to making us physically unwell (in addition to making us less happy and less productive!) There is a growing body of authoritative evidence suggesting that indoor air quality can be more seriously polluted than outdoor air, even in the largest most industrial cities. E.g. the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates indoor air quality to be 2-5 times more polluted than outdoor air, on average (https://cfpub.epa.gov/roe/chapter/air/indoorair.cfm). I will go into the detail of why this is the case, and what can be done about it, in a separate post. Do make a mental note to check back soon and read it, if interested. The bottom line is, that just like healthy food and healthy lifestyles are becoming mainstream, something similar is sure to happen in the sphere of the built environment. The transition will take time, and will be uncomfortable for many in the industry (but it will happen). 

Symptoms of Indoor Air Pollution
A less cheery topic: indoor air pollution.
Source: https://www.aplusinspections.net/indoor-air-quality-mold-inspections/

INTERACTION WITH ONE ANOTHER, COMFORT

Moving on to interaction and our dealings with one another. I cannot help but notice how much these are affected by the way our interiors are set up. Example. I take my children to a gymnastics class, and the organisers have been clever enough to separate a small part of the hall for parents and children to sit in before and after their class. Now unfortunately the cleverness ends there, as the chairs are always arranged in long rows, all facing into one direction. In addition to being uncomfortable and impractical (oh, and you are literally staring at a wall), the arrangement also discourages interaction. How about putting them in a circle, into clusters, or even scattering randomly around the space. This is just one example. Time and time again, I notice people: A) not interacting with one another when they could be; or B) being visibly uncomfortable when dealing with others, in settings where interiors have been poorly designed. At reception desks, commercial counters, offices, you name it.

Cartoon of man at office desk

Comfort (or lack thereof) in an office setting. Source: http://www.hysdfurniture.com/?p=2984

Sure, these are just little things and situations, but they all add up to a bigger problem. When interiors are poorly designed, their users suffer (I’m not trying to be overly dramatic, to be clear this may be literal or metaphorical!) I know that some people will be sceptical, suggesting I tone down my cheerleading for Interior Designers. But maybe try this thought process. Most of the housing, commercial, institutional and retail building stock that we will come across in our lifetimes has already been built, i.e. it exists. It follows that what we do with these existing buildings and their interiors, the very definition of Interior Design, can make a meaningful difference to our lives (and our planet – more on this in another forthcoming blog post). Interior Design is at its most useful when it concerns itself first with people, and second with spaces (not vice versa).